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June 21, 2017

Anti-Porn 'Docu-Series' 'Ten Million Throwaways' Wraps Production

LOS ANGELES—The six-part so-called "docu-series" Ten Million Throwaways has just completed shooting its final episode, and in its wake has sent out its first press release—and wouldn't you know that the most exciting thing they have to say about it is that it's being narrated by famous Hollywood actor Michael Madsen, whom moviegoers know well from such major hits as Reservoir Dogs, Donnie Brasco, Kill Bill and Sin City? (Hopefully, he's just doing it for the money—and with a reported budget of $1.2 million, they can probably afford him.) But what's this exciting production about, you ask? Well, Ten Million Throwaways claims to "shine a light on the adult entertainment industry and its direct links to human sex trafficking, which generates $32 billion every year," and was "filmed on location in several countries as well as sex trafficking hotspots in Los Angeles, Las Vegas and Phoenix, Arizona." But wait; that's not all! Ten Million Throwaways "tells the R-rated story of a handful of individuals on both sides of the camera. All were involved in the adult film business and all were either sexually abused as children or exposed to graphic material at a young age. From ex-adult stars and recovering sex addicts, to the leading US organizations that exist to combat the flow-on effects of the adult entertainment pandemic, the documentary uncovers the illegal operating practices of this multi-billion dollar industry which continues to fuel human sex trafficking on American soil." In a word: HORSESHIT! The adult entertainment industry in Los Angeles and Las Vegas (and we're guessing Phoenix as well) uses NO trafficked women or men, certainly no trafficked (or any other kind of) children, and engages in NO "illegal operating practices"—and guess what? The industry even has a trade organization, the Free Speech Coalition, that keeps track of adult industry practices and whose members, including the industry's largest producers, follow a Code of Ethics that ensures that all performers are treated professionally, supports their right to discontinue shooting for any reason, and uses "performance and other service contracts and model releases that are clearly written and properly tailored to the circumstances." And though not explicitly stated, the Code clearly bars member companies from using any performer who appears to be on-set unwillingly—or what this series would call "trafficked." But rest assured, Australian writer/director Andrew Douglas, who also owns this series' production company, White Shadow Films, has assembled a small coterie of anti-industry and pro-censorship participants whom many in the adult industry recognize as "the usual suspects." For instance, two of the former performers who are interviewed extensively are Crissy Moran and Elizabeth Rollings (under her current real name Jan Villarubia), both past (and possibly present) acolytes of the Pink Cross Foundation, owned by anti-porn activist (and former performer and prostitute) Shelley Lubben. Another interviewee is Patrick Trueman, former Justice Department obscenity prosecutor and CEO of the National Center on Sexual Exploitation—and strangely enough, Trueman's right-hand gal, Dawn Hawkins, is listed as a "production assistant" on the show. Also on tap is one former dancer, Harmony Dust, as well as a musician, Jason Chu, and another guy, Mitch Salmon, both described as "former pornography addicts"—and that's it; the entire cast for all six episodes as detailed on the Internet Movie DataBase (IMDB). However, it probably couldn't hurt to mention that one of the "researchers" listed on the series is University of Pennsylvania Prof. Mary Anne Layden, a fixture of the anti-porn movement for more that two decades. One bright light, though: According to IMDB, "It looks like we don't have any release dates for this title yet." Pictured: A screen grab from the series trailer, which appears to have nothing to do with the adult industry or trafficked persons. Perhaps also of interest: there appears to be no size online of the series promo poster that is large enough to read who's supposed to have said the three quotes listed on the poster.

 
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