�
You are here: Home » Adult Webmaster News » Bailey Rayne Discusses 'Hot Girls Wanted:...
Select year   and month 
 
April 28, 2017

Bailey Rayne Discusses 'Hot Girls Wanted: Turned On'

LOS ANGELES—Adult model Bailey Rayne tells AVN she has been “proactive” with the creators of Hot Girls Wanted: Turned On since its premiere, addressing the issues that have sparked a new round of controversy. As one of the primary subjects of Episode 3 of the six-part docu-series on Netflix—titled “Owning It”—Rayne says she has been communicating with the producers, making it clear she’s upset with their inclusion of several models’ personal information in the final cut. That includes her own legal name and the unit number of her condo. “I contacted the crew,” Rayne says. “They said we’ll ask Netflix if we can edit it. I thought being proactive went way further than attacking them.” Since the documentary debuted last Friday numerous adult industry professionals have expressed anger and disbelief, saying the producers violated the privacy of some of the models in the series by showing their real names and in one case, a personal Facebook page. Earlier Friday the industry trade group Free Speech Coalition sent a letter to the producers asking them to pull the show off Netflix. According to Rayne, they are taking that under consideration. “They are considering taking my episode down and I think that’s proof they realize they messed up,” Rayne says. “I told them I was upset. I was stern about it. That’s them accepting that they messed up, and I think that’s really important. It shows they really didn’t mean it. “I’ve been apologized to several times. The producer I worked with directly feels terrible and had no idea that would even impact my job. It was just a signature on a piece of artwork and she didn’t think it would be noticeable. But I had two fans figure it out. It’s just an oversight. It would’ve made sense to blur it out. Same with the unit number on my door.” Episode 3 also showed some personal tip information for Rayne’s members on MyFreeCams, which she did not want made public. But despite the obvious problems with the episode, which runs for 50 minutes and also follows the stories of porn performer Kylie Page and cam model Salena Storm, Rayne says what made the cut is a fair representation of what transpired. She claims the producers chose to leave out a lot of the “most damning” footage. “I'm not totally happy with my episode and how everyone was portrayed but I'm not going to sit here and discredit the entire series,” Rayne says. “They didn’t share as much as they could’ve.” The 25-year-old cam girl and glamour model from Indiana carried the main narrative of Episode 3, allowing the documentary crew to follow her when she was working as an assistant agent for Matrix Models’ owner John Steven in addition to camming on MyFreeCams. Her job was to recruit and mentor porn newcomers such as Page and Storm. She says she recruited Storm, but that Steven connected her with Page, who is still with the agency. Rayne stopped working as an assistant agent for Matrix last summer after about a year and a half, while Hot Girls Wanted was still filming her, but that is not shown in the episode. Then last month she left the agency. “I feel bad we don’t look perfect in the documentary, but we don’t have a perfect industry either, no industry is,” Rayne says. “People are people. We can criticize them for the stupid mistakes like not censoring legal names, but I think the stories themselves are accurate—in my episode at least.” Rayne says her single biggest complaint is how the footage made it seem as though she was opposed to new girls doing boy/girl sex scenes. “I feel like there were maybe a few miscommunications between myself and the producers,” she explains. “I feel like maybe they thought I was totally against boy/girl content, which I’m not.” Rayne advises new girls they may want to consider starting their careers slowly and building their brand before going all-in with boy/girl, but she is not against it. “If you do want to start out doing boy/girl I don’t think that’s a bad thing at all,” Rayne says. “I would never tell someone not to do boy/girl if they were comfortable with it. “I can understand how they may have thought I felt that way. For the most part I thought it was pretty accurate. Everything that was on [the episode] really happened. They made some people look better than they could have. I feel that their purpose was not to take away our confidence as performers or our feelings of empowerment. They just didn’t fully understand what we were trying to say and I don’t think they fully understood the impact of some of the things they shared, too.” Rayne adds, “Our legal name is something we hold so close and dear. If it gets out, our families can be hurt. I don’t think the producers fully understood that or at least the editing staff didn’t. It’s common sense. They did it to me and several others. “I really don’t think they realized the impact it would have if they shared it. If they had someone from the industry on the editing team to say, ‘you cant show this, you can’t show that,’ I think that could’ve made a difference.” Rayne says she remains close with fellow MFC model Salena Storm, whom she suggests was portrayed as “a very strong, independent woman in this industry.” Storm earlier this week told AVN the episode came up short in telling her story. Like Storm, Rayne says she worked closely with Herzog & Company’s Sandra Alvarez, the supervising producer and director of Episode 3; and also executive producer Peter LoGreco. Alvarez has not responded to a request for comment. Rayne first made contact with the producers in December of 2015 and originally was slated to be part of Episode 5 titled “Take Me Private.” “I was actually supposed to do the cam girl episode, where I fly out and meet a member for the first time, but I couldn’t find a member to do it—nobody wanted their face on camera which I can understand,” Rayne says. By February of last year Rayne found out the producers wanted to focus an episode on her unique role with Matrix, spending several months with the crew. Now she logs onto MFC almost every day, reserving her big months for May and October when she’ll do up to 14 hours a day on cam. She also occasionally shoots for Penthouse—she was the Penthouse Pet in November 2015—and is turning her attention to a few other projects in June. “My highest rank on MFC was number 16 during a big cam month,” Rayne says. “If I do that twice a year I’m able to relax and focus on my production company, and sometimes I take a month off.” Rayne also works as a model recruiter for Playboy Plus—which so far has photographed every girl she has recommended to them, including Storm—and assists photographer Holly Randall with her various social media platforms. “It’s a lot of fun,” Rayne says.

 
�
�
�
home | register | log in | add URL | add premium URL | forums | news | advertising | contact | sitemap
copyright © 1998 - 2009 Adult Webmasters Association. All rights reserved.