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November 01, 2017

Bree Mills Discusses The Power of Acting

This special report is featured in the November issue of AVN magazine. Click here to see the digital edition. LOS ANGELES—It’s not unusual for performers to shed tears on the set of a PureTaboo scene—many times it’s not even in the script. “People cry,” says co-director Bree Mills. “In almost every episode one person at least cries because they’re so proud of what they’re doing. I won’t name names but it’s males and females.” Mills wants to change the perception that adult performers can’t act, making it the primary focus of PureTaboo.com, her latest creation that launched in September. The Head of Production for Gamma Films Group sees a goldmine of acting talent in porn—the catch is it’s often lying beneath the surface waiting to be tapped. “When I started to come up with the idea for PureTaboo I wanted to challenge everything that I had ever done and I wanted to challenge pretty much everything I had been told not to do,” Mills tells AVN. “One of the main stereotypes in our industry that’s always existed and certainly still exists today is the idea that the story—it doesn’t matter how much storyline porn is trending—people are always like, ‘Who really cares about the story or who really cares about the acting? They don’t call it mattress actress for nothing.’” But Mills refuses to accept the notion that porn performers lack the emotional depth necessary to bring her haunting stories about the dark side of human nature to life. She says it’s quite the contrary. “I’ve always considered myself an actor’s director more than anything else,” says Mills, who calls the shots for every PureTaboo episode along with seasoned veteran Craven Moorehead. “I just love working with scripts and basically the same way you’d approach it if you were doing a play. I really wanted to challenge the stigmas that exist about the importance of acting in adult.” To say her methods appear to be working would be an understatement. At press time Mills & Co. had just released Half His Age: A Teenage Tragedy, the first feature-length film from PureTaboo that was rolled out in three parts. The movie follows a perverted high school teacher (Charles Dera) who has an an affair with his student (Jill Kassidy) and then gets caught by a fellow student (Kristen Scott) who threatens to expose their secret. Several of the early episodes feature some of the top performers in porn cast in rare dramatic roles. They include Adriana Chechik, Tommy Pistol and Chad White (“Crossing Borders”); Aubrey Sinclair and Danny Mountain (“A Charitable Man”); Elena Koskha and Derrick Pierce (“The Allowance”); and Piper Perri and Tyler Knight (“Fuck Me First Daddy”), among dozens of others. But the process starts with Mills in front of her computer; she writes and produces about 10 PureTaboo episodes per month—each one begins with a three-page story treatment—in addition to her duties managing various other projects in the Gamma Entertainment universe. “Bree is a powerhouse,” says performer Charles Dera, who stars in Half His Age. “She never takes a break. I feel that she translates the feeling of the scene to the actors so well. We do ‘porn script theater’ as she calls it before shooting the scene. Really getting the feeling and energy down. Nothing is scripted which I love. We ad-lib everything once the scene is explained. We generally get it in three takes at the most. That way the energy is not lost.” Dera adds, “Bree writes and directs which is vital to the production—it keeps the passion alive. Craven Morehead, Billy Visual and Matt Holder are a dream team. They are friends and family to me. It’s so easy to perform when I’m in such a comfortable environment. I always look forward to my PureTaboo days!” Whitney Wright, who debuted in porn last September and is featured in A Mother’s Choice opposite India Summer and Robby Echo, tells AVN, “Shooting with PureTaboo has definitely been more interesting and more in depth than any other shoot I’ve ever done.” “Both times, Bree has really stressed the importance of getting into character and fully embodying your role—from your character’s quirks and mannerisms right down to facial reactions and room presence,” Wright says. “Throughout the entire scene, she calls you by your character name instead of your performer name, and throughout each scene she guides you through what your character is feeling, and why. So much so that you really start to feel as your character would—betrayed, frightened, sinister, self-serving, motive-driven… “Being cast for PureTaboo is so much more than just being booked for another scene. … Working with Bree and Craven at the helm is always an amazing experience, and I love seeing the passion and excitement that Bree invests in each scene. I’m looking forward to the upcoming weeks as more PureTaboo scenes release and I cannot wait to see the feedback and praise pour in for such a deserving website, cast and crew.” Elsa Jean starred in “Girl Tagging” along with Ryan Driller and Reena Sky, telling AVN she enjoyed her first PureTaboo experience. “I loved that I got to switch things up and do a scene with more acting,” Elsa says. “I’ve always wanted to see how my work would improve with more acting in the scene. Bree is such a great director and she really lets you be yourself and get into your part. She’s such an encouraging director. She improves your performance by letting you be as creative as you want.” Derrick Pierce, a performer known for his versatility, became a go-to guy for Mills’ edgy 2016 launch, PrettyDirty.com, and more recently played an unforgiving john opposite Elena Koshka’s escort character in “The Allowance” for PureTaboo. “Myself and Ryan Driller and a few other guys legitimately made a career out of acting in porn and I know that sounds like an oxymoron,” Pierce tells AVN. “Tell someone not in the business that there’s dialogue in porn and they think it’s funny.” But the kind of intensity Pierce brings in “The Allowance” as the cold-blooded millionaire who is accustomed to renting women is no laughing matter. “If they give me that type of a role, I’m going to own it,” Pierce says. “They’re trying to draw you into more than just the sex. They want you to explore the what if, the potentially fucked-up shit that people buy. Their approach to things is a very real approach to embracing people’s inhibitions. It’s not just the sex, it’s not just coming on some girl’s face. All that stuff is secondary. “When you watch you know they’re going to fuck, obviously, that’s a given. But it’s how do they get there, what does that consist of, how does that work?” In this exclusive Q&A, Mills, who also founded the critically acclaimed Girlsway Network in 2014, provides candid insight about exactly how it works as she discusses the state of adult acting, her determination to showcase it and what it takes to achieve the level of performance that is becoming the signature of PureTaboo.com. AVN: How does your process with PureTaboo differ from other sites such as Girlsway? BM: With Girlsway we use a very traditional feature-making approach with how we make that content—so three, sometimes four-camera setups. In the projects when I would come in and write and co-direct them with StillsbyAlan I always did full scripts using the same format that you would use if you were doing a mainstream project. It works very well within that medium. … With PureTaboo I thought if I’m going to take such gritty, dark, real-world subjects why don’t I work with the actors to bring that to life and not necessarily try to put words in their mouth. We can use the Elena [Koskha] example [in “The Allowance”]. A lot of people have talked to me about, ‘My god, I can’t believe the performance that was given.’ None of that was scripted. It was coming together and spending a long day on set flushing out who is this girl? What is her situation? How would you react if you were in that situation? What kind of experience can you draw from people you know or your own background to bring into this character? Let’s plot out what would happen. That’s a good example of what I discovered early on was the right approach to take to this was to not try to write every single word that these characters are going to say. If you want to make something feel real and you want to make something feel natural then the best thing to do is to let people lose themselves in the character and what comes out comes out. I think when I started to write the early episodes my first attempt was, OK, I’m going to write a script and then about two pages into it I was like fuck this, this doesn’t sound real. This sounds like me kind of projecting. And so I quickly abandoned that and went into let me be the storyteller. Let me know inside and out what the story is going to be about and give enough of a stage for the actors to come on and we’ll all work together to flush out these characters, which is ultimately how we’ve approached every single episode we’ve done for PureTaboo. When you say you wanted to challenge everything you had been told not to do, what do you mean more specifically? When I said I wanted to approach this project differently I mean it. I want PureTaboo to be an example of challenging everything that porn should and should not be. So for example, ‘Don’t care about the acting.’ Well it’s the number one thing we care about. ‘Don’t rehearse.’ Well we spend all day workshopping the stories. ‘Don’t break the line.’ Oh, we break the line with our cinematography. With most of it we draw a lot of inspiration from documentaries and docu-series-style cinematography. We have a few very experienced industry camera guys working on this project but we’ve also brought in mainstream cinematographers who mostly have experience doing documentaries to help capture; what you’re seeing in terms of those long takes is a perfect example of our process. Let’s take Elena and Derrick. We’ll rehearse everything that we’re going to say and get them to a point where they basically have memorized their own improv and then we bring a cameraperson to be a fly on the wall and he just moves in amongst them while they’re talking. He knows when to pivot here, when to move there and what you see are sequences that have very few cuts. That’s something that because we spend maybe an hour rehearsing both the acting and the cinematography and then we roll one take and we’ve got it—maybe two takes to get two different passes at it. But it’s definitely different than what you would see. I wanted to try to bring in cinematography techniques that you see in crime dramas. In the Heat of the Night was one of the best examples of sort of breaking the line on television back in the early 80s by taking handheld camera operators into mingling with the actors and the results were this fly-on-the-wall feeling that you get from kind of going in and being in the scene. That’s what I want, because so many of these subjects are psychologically driven I like the idea of making you feel like you’re in the room. You feel like you’re watching a play, which is kind of how we structure the day, so it does have a very cool, very different look. I’ve had a bunch of people look at me like ‘you guys didn’t cut.’ … That’s the acting. The whole scene takes place in a room but you never are bored.  What does the handheld shot convey that the long static shot doesn’t? It creates a feeling of intimacy because you’re sort of in there in the action. It’s not perfect and that’s one of the things that I try in an effort to up the realism factor. The fact that everything is so free-flowing and natural means it’s not going to be perfect. If somebody stumbles over their line or they don’t pick something I would rather leave it in because it feels like it would happen in real life where usually things aren’t so proper. Same thing with the camera. The camera gets right in there and can even kind of move and adjust as the scene is unfolding and it doesn’t have to be perfectly framed. It doesn’t have to be completely smooth and seamless. I actually like the grittiness of it. It’s also, especially given the tone that we take to present them, having that sort of intimate, right in the room, adds to the overall emotional effect that we’re trying to get out of it. And I take that into the sex, too. So we have, in effect, a gonzo camera throughout the entire sex scene that is supported by the long lens, static on-tripod shots. But we still are able to mix the two together which is another taboo in itself that we’re breaking in adult production, where you’re either gonzo or you’re feature and you’re not having this weird mix of both. We said fuck it, let’s break all the rules. And you get the good angles of gonzo within the cinematic, three-camera structure, which is always one of the challenges and I guess frustrations that I felt from shooting in that kind of classic, multi-cam static setup. You can’t get in there; you can zoom in to a point but you can’t get in there the way you can with gonzo. But with gonzo you’re limiting yourself being able to capture multiple angles and that sort of thing. So it’s an interesting marry of both I’ve found of what we do. Many porn performers have little or no previous acting experience. How do you navigate that and how are you able to inspire them to go someplace that perhaps no one ever asked them to go? I’m pretty selective on who we cast and I try to do my homework before we bring somebody on set for the first time to get a sense of where…not just what I see in terms of are they trending, but also what is their personality like, what else have I seen them do? Do I think I could extract something else out of them? So I’m pretty picky about who we bring on and I won’t ever pair two new people together. I’ll keep somebody from my cast who I know has drunk the Kool-Aid, so to speak—my favorite saying—and I will work with that newbie and nine out of 10 times so far we’ve actually had great success. The first thing somebody does when they come on set—and we’re starting to get to the point where people are aware enough about the product that usually they’ve done their homework, too—they’re kind of excited to be there. My first thing is I make them watch an episode because there’s no way to explain what we’re doing unless you see it. So I’ll have them usually watch one or two intros to give them an understanding of the tone and the style of the episode mostly because we really try to structure it like a television episode. So it’s got an opening hook, it’s got all these different elements. So I’ll use that as a springboard to explain to them about the vision of the product and how we make it. Then the first thing that we do is talk about the characters and then we talk about the backstory of all these characters. So who is Elena Koshka’s character in “The Allowance”? How long have her and Manny been dating? What’s the backstory on all of that—and we’ll just create histories for all the characters. So everybody knows before we start anything what everybody’s backstory is. And I find that that’s something that helps because a lot of performers, let’s face it, they’re coming from something. There’s some aspect of their personal experience that nine out of 10 times they can relate to some aspect of one of these stories, or they know somebody. Just to give you an example I had a performer on set and we were going through her character and the backstory and throughout the course of the episode she’s explaining her story and she said, ‘I relate to this perfectly, I’m going to just tell my story.’ And in the episode when she’s talking about—in this case her character was a runaway—but when she was talking about how that all happened she just told her story. And I find that happens a lot with the actors we bring on set because we first start talking about who are these people? Who are these characters? It doesn’t matter if you’re a villain or you’re a hero, everyone’s going to have a story. That automatically gets everyone to start padding their characters with their own life experiences, which is that sort of method acting approach. So that by the time they start to act they’ve just kind of created this version or variation of themselves or somebody they know so they can pull from it. What I try to focus on with them during rehearsals is just let’s not spoon-feed the audience. Let’s forget that this is a porn production. Let’s try to put this in how you would say it naturally. And the results are amazing. It’s I think maybe the setting up the emphasis we take on the characters and the fact that I’m kind of counting on a lot of them to pull something from their own lives to bring into the character that have allowed these performances to come out. But you know I don’t do anything but give these people the stage and backstory. I think really if this project can be a testament to anything it’s that the talent exists. It doesn’t take very much to tap into it. It’s just never tapped into. And of course people don’t recognize, man that girl can actually act. She did do theater all through high school; she has been very interested in that. But it’s just never cared about. I think another great example would be—I’ve shot Piper Perri several times and man that girl can act. She’s one of the top performers in the industry right now and she’s on all the ads and she’s obviously got her look and her performing, but man that girl can act. But nobody ever gives her the showcase. It’s just giving performers both male and female the opportunity to show what they already have. How much of acting is something you’re born with and how much of it can you learn and is something you can be trained to do? I think you need to be born with a certain amount of confidence on camera or in front of people. I think that has to be to a degree a natural instinct. All of these performers already have that, to be able to get out and perform in front of camera and crews, not everybody can do that. So they’ve already got that certain level of confidence or whatnot, to be able to perform. I think that’s something that needs to be with you from the beginning. And I think in order to act, especially with the type of stuff that I’m doing, it’s more just a mindset that you need to learn—the ability to stop thinking about whether or not your acting and just lose yourself in the situation. When you remove the pressure—at least I’ve found—when you remove the pressure of having to memorize lines, especially lines you didn’t receive until the morning of as often happens; or this sort of idea that you need to act this part, well I don’t want you to act this part I just want you to figure out a way to identify with that character and then let that come out naturally. I think people once they can tap into that it’s easier, especially if you feel confident enough to do that. … I think one of my favorite examples or what I try to base a lot or what I often think of is what Larry Clark does. Larry Clark is a filmmaker who made the film Kids in the mid-90s. And what he did he had found a kid who had written a script, it was sort of this young skateboarder in New York who had written this script and they went and they cast a couple of unknown actors who had done nothing but at least had done some training, but then he just surrounded them with a bunch of kids he had actually found on the street and he wanted to get that feeling of realism so he just let a bunch of kids come in and he sort of structured them and he helped move the story from point A to point B. But he used these non-actors to do it which is part of why the film was so controversial because it felt so real. And they were dealing with subjects of sexuality. He got a lot of attention from people saying, ‘How did you make this documentary?’ Well, no this is a film, it’s fiction. But those aren’t actors. No, they’re not classically trained actors but they put on this performance. So in a way what we’re doing with PureTaboo as well is we’re taking quite a lot of experience—some with not as much—who are willing to come in and have this experience with me. You mentioned several names in your Reddit AMA (on Sept. 29) of people that came in and did a great job. When you think about your cast members so far, who really surprised you and exceeded your expectations? Elena Koshka would be one for sure. It’s interesting because the first episode that I directed with her she was just this kind of goofy, sweet girl. It was more actually how she acted—just her being her—that I took notice of and it translated very well to her character that I knew by the time I was going to bring her back for another episode I kind of knew her. So I knew how to cast her and I knew how I wanted to challenge her as a director. And so at that point I took what I saw organically happening the first time I worked with her and really tried to channel that into more of a dramatic piece the second time and she took to it—like I said she drank the Kool-Aid. I’m actually shooting her again in a character that she kind of helped conceive because she’s so inspired by this work as well. Piper Perri I mentioned. I had actually shot her before for a previous project, but she came and did a great, great run with us—a couple of episodes—and just killed it. But also I find the people who do the best performance are also the people who really, really, really want to do well so that they show up on set and are so excited and enthusiastic about the project. She was one who was like ‘I want to show the world what I can do and I want show people that I’m more than what people have seen.’ Aubrey Sinclair is another one and she’s shot three episodes for us now. Same deal she came in and just came in with such a good attitude and could connect to the story and was willing to just push and push and push. She was the one coming up with, ‘Hey, it would be great if it ended like this.’ Really owning her character. That’s one of the most beautiful things I’m finding from this project—that is by setting the stage we’ve really been able to get such intense, strong scenes because the actresses are like, ‘You know I’ve never done a DP but I should. The character would do one.’ And I’m like, ‘OK, do one.’ ‘This should be a creampie. This really would end as a creampie.’ … ’OK, if you guys are cool, then yeah.’ A lot of our scenes have some extra additions to them because that’s the type of attitude that girls have had. Those three I mentioned come in and are like, ‘Let’s take this further. You wrote it here but I’m willing to go here if you want. I want to do that, because that’s what the character would do.’ Then I’ve got my staples; I love working with [Adriana] Chechik, ever since I worked with her years ago in The Turning. We’ve shot her a couple times and she’s one of my favorite actresses to work with. I remember when we shot her in The Turning, this was 2015 I think. It was the first time she’d ever really done an acting role at that time in her career and she came up to me at the AVNs that year—I think she had been nominated for Best Actress—and she said, ’Thank you, thanks for thinking that I’m more than just my holes.’ And it was one of those things where I actually thought it was so sad when she said that. I thought to myself if I can really do anything in this industry, it’s going to be to help showcase that girls do not have to feel just that way. She of course has gone on to do great things and when I’m working with her on set she’s a great actress. She takes direction really well. She loves to see the dramatic work; she’s a huge fan of a lot of this type of mainstream content. So she’s probably someone I like to work with on a regular basis. Then I’ve got the Tommy Pistol’s and the people that are super fun to shoot. I’ve shot Tommy a number of times; he’s on the monthly roster at this point. Great actor, obviously. One of my resident creeps I can use. Chad [White], we’ve had him a couple of times; Michael Vegas is another strong one; Ryan Driller is another strong one. The whole cast of Half His Age, which is the first feature that we’ve put out this year to introduce the product. That whole cast, talk about a group of players coming together. We had Charles, we had Xander [Corvus], we had Small Hands, who is a very underrated actor—like a great actor. And then we had Kristen Scott who I love working with who’s also excellent and little Jill Kassidy. She came out of nowhere. Here’s this nice, sweet Texas girl and she killed it. And now we’ve probably shot her more than any other single performer for PureTaboo just because she hit such a stride with us so early. She was like, ‘You know what, I’m so used to being cast this way but I love doing this twisted stuff. I love the acting.’ She’s been a great advocate for us since the launch in terms of promoting her work on the site. It’s a perfect place to showcase someone who otherwise is not going to get a lot of attention for acting but is a fast-rising star within the industry. She’s someone that’s totally sweet and looks like your next-door neighbor and is a ferocious sex performer. Like really has a great energy with the camera and plays to it and she’s pretty daring. She’s going to really grow in that capacity. But also loves the acting. She’s been real fun—we’ve had her play all kinds of things. People are going to see all sides of Jill Kassidy. What about your crew? How were you able to find that chemistry and develop it? We use a core team of people actually for all of the Gamma Films productions we run out of LA. It started as a small crew that we put together when we were launching Girlsway and then it kind of grew over the last few years to include more and more players. My approach with the crew is that we’re a family. They’re all over at my house for the holidays. It’s a real close group. We’re all artists and filmmakers and we love what we do and enthusiasm is contagious. What it took to bring PureTaboo to life was not just my idea, it was taking the idea and hashing it out with this collective. So I work with Craven Moorehead on this project. We started this together and he brings a lot of experience from 20 years in the industry and is really the anchor of the crew. He’s the one that organizes everybody and makes sure that we move from location to location. He manages all of our audio; he’s one of our cameramen. He’s definitely the real strong, stable, calm diplomat amongst us. Then you have myself and Matt Holder who are like the artistes within the group. And I’m doing all the actors’ direction and obviously I structure the overall day in terms of what we’re going to shoot. I work with Matt on doing choreography basically because between camera and the actors we’re working out these elaborate sequences with minimal takes and we’re kind of running all over the set. We act things out ourselves and we’re plotting out where we want people to be and then we’re bringing the actors in. We’re really kind of the crazy artists of the group. Everybody has multi-talents. You have people who are directors on other sites or other projects who are working for us; you have people who are cameramen and PAs. Everybody acts; we all do cameos in the scenes. … We all also act in the episodes, so it is like this crazy group of people. We’re making little movies and that’s what we love to do and so it has a great chemistry because it’s not, ‘Hey, I’m going to show up and get paid and go home’ type of deal. Yes at the end of the day we’re all paying our bills but we’re there because it’s a mission and not a job.  I think the testament really can be shown in the fact that every single one of the members of my crew they’re watching every edit. They’re critiquing all the stuff; they’re meeting about it; we’re talking about how to improve it. It’s literally looking at a living organism and we’re all responsible for it growing and it developing. Everybody cares equally and that’s something that I know is very hard to achieve, especially when you’re working with a group of traditional freelancers. They work on multiple sets for multiple companies. I think there’s a lot of status quo about how to do things, what to care about, what not to and we’ve been able to create something that every single one of those crew members feels connected to and responsible for and cares about—as they should. Because it was only brought to life by all of us working together. How do you stay organized? I’m a very organized person. I have a whole pre-production schedule that we put in place for each episode that we direct and then obviously directing the episode on set and then working with the editors in post-production. One of my senior editors at Gamma has taken the leadership role in editing this series and is so much a part of that core group. I mean talk about passion and enthusiasm and making something 10 times better than it would be otherwise. Our editor Woody back in Montreal is just doing a phenomenal job and is another very impassioned person within our group. … I’m very lucky that I have talented directors and producers. With Girlsway I was able to step back quite a bit last year and then let Allan do a lot more of the day-to-day production and leadership role there while I focused on the other stuff. It’s a busy life. I do need an assistant. I do not currently but I really should. And I have plans to. It’s earmarked that I need one by early 2018 and I think I’m on track for it at this point. I don’t really rest a lot. I’ve had to become a bit of a mental porn factory just to keep coming up with ideas. You don’t want to look at the notes in my phone, I’d probably get arrested if someone were to see them. Stuff like, ‘Would you follow me to the car?’ That’s an idea for a story. What made you decide to start posting the original episode treatments on the site? I really want to use this series as a way to say ‘fuck all the conventions’ that relate to how to shoot, release and promote adult content. I want to make must-see TV with the added bonus of having hardcore sex in it. Why do we have to short-change ourselves for that? So the way that our website is set up is also breaking a lot of our conventions. I want to have my cast on there. I want to have the scene treatment. Why do we have to do these cheesy scene descriptions that we re-write? Let’s take the scene treatments and post them for fans to see how they brought it to life. It’s another reason in our BTS we do stuff like director’s commentaries and other things that focus on actually talking about the experience of the acting side of it. All these things you don’t usually see and the scene treatments are a good example of that. My entire approach to producing content has always been transparency and engagement with our fans. Girlsway has gotten to the point now where the community is so large that well over 50 percent of our monthly production comes from stories that they write that we just crowd-source. I’m creatively driving all those stories but I’m lifting ideas from everywhere and talking to people every single day on the site and our other sites. We have done other things to sort of break that convention that you shouldn’t be talking to your fans. I disagree. I think you should talk to them a lot more. When you think about this five-year run you’ve been on, all the studios, the work that’s out there, what comes to mind? What I’m happy about is I’ve never run out of steam creatively. That what interests me most in this life is having opportunities to create. And I love to set things up, that’s kind of my thing. I love to start things. I like to pick the color of the drapes; I like to choose everything in the frame and then I’ll do that and I’ll get it to a point and let it live and then I’ll do that with something else. That’s just been my behavior for the last five years. I’ve been with Gamma for almost 10 years now, so I was behind the scenes for a long time before I started working in production and I kind of went from being interested in that to, oh I’m kind of interested in production. I have some quasi-experience. Let me go learn about adult production. OK well let’s start this site. Now let’s build a whole network. Let’s do this. Let me go out and make the Law & Order of porn. Fortunately I have a lot of autonomy to be creatively free and I have a lot of trust from the guys at Gamma. That’s what’s interesting, that perhaps some more recent fans of the product may not realize. That you were at the office working behind the scenes before all this. I think because I worked as Gamma’s marketing director for many years I was always working with content and mostly interested in how people were consuming it. What did they find interesting with this line versus this line? And my background before adult was in marketing as well. I’ve always been fascinated by porn fans, in particular their behaviors and their appetites and all the nuances. The psychology of sex. Why I’m still here 10 years later is that’s what I find fascinating.  Photo 1: (Top row, from left): Charles Dera, Lisa Sloane, Whitney Wright, Elsa Jean, Elena Koshka, Small Hands & Ryan Driller; (middle row) Kristen Scott, Craven Moorehead, Bree Mills & Billy Visual; (bottom row) Matt Holder, AJ Bucks & Cherie DeVille. (courtesy of Gamma Films) Photo 2: Derrick Pierce & Elena Koshka in “The Allowance.” Photo 3: Jill Kassidy & Kristen Scott in “Half His Age: A Teenage Tragedy - Part 3” Photo 4: India Summer & Whitney Wright in “A Mother’s Choice.” Photo 5: Elsa Jean in “Girl Tagging.” Photo 6: Charles Dera & Jill Kassidy in Half His Age: A Teenage Tragedy - Part 1” Photo 7: Small Hands, Robby Echo & Piper Perri in “The Deflowering.” Photo 8: Adriana Chechik & Chad White in “Crossing Borders.” Photo 9: Aubrey Sinclair in “A Charitable Man.” Photo 10: (Top row, from left): Kristen Scott, Whitney Wright, Elsa Jean, Elena Koshka & Cherie DeVille; (bottom row) Craven Moorehead & Bree Mills. (courtesy of Gamma Films)

 
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